Ceramicscardiff's

Student Profiles

As part of the run up to the degree show 2013 , we have documented the themes and debates confronted by our students at the beginning of their final year on the undergraduate programme. These ideas may change or become more defined in later practice but stay posted for examples of the thinking taking place in the ceramics department this autumn term:

Correlations Between Ceramic Processes and Art Therapy In her second year Katie noticed how engaging with different stages in ceramic processes could enable you to tap into different mind sets or emotional spaces such as, throwing being all consuming allowing little space for extraneous thoughts and the simplicity and repetitive nature of whittling allowing the mind to wonder onto other things. This recognition sparked the idea of finding correlations between ceramics processes and art therapy techniques. The most important question now is, if the final outcome of her studio practice can be enhanced by this knowledge, if ideas can be harnessed and developed further by understanding this relationship.

Katie Gamble. Correlations Between Ceramic Processes and Art Therapy ........................................................................ In her second year Katie noticed how engaging with different stages in ceramic processes could enable you to tap into different mind sets or emotional spaces such as, throwing being all consuming allowing little space for extraneous thoughts and the simplicity and repetitive nature of whittling allowing the mind to wonder onto other things. This recognition sparked the idea of finding correlations between ceramics processes and art therapy techniques. The most important question now is, if the final outcome of her studio practice can be enhanced by this knowledge, if ideas can be harnessed and developed further by understanding this relationship.

 Amberlea McNaught Finding a Contemporary Language Through Pattern  My recent adventures into the plaster room have enabled me to create hybrids of traditional and industrial techniques; casting in particular allowing to explore repeat forms and at the same time maintain the precision of hand carving.  I have just found a new love in my life, only this week - the potential to transfer image onto plaster, which has opened onto new design potentials. I now have a way to speak through pattern, to communicate meaning directly to a viewer but what is the most important thing to say?  The materials and processes of ceramic have global significance, through them I can look backward as well as forward, across continents and across language barriers, perhaps this is where the answer lies, what more important message can there be than to remind us of our interconnectedness, our shared humanity.   I¡¯m now at a very exiting pivotal point in my practise, changing direction completely with new processes. It¡¯s a very satisfying feeling to constantly be learning and developing new techniques. My task now is to radically change form and begin distilling my concept in to surface¡­.

Amberlea McNaught Finding a Contemporary Language Through Pattern ............................................................................ My recent adventures into the plaster room have enabled me to create hybrids of traditional and industrial techniques; in particular using casting to explore repeat forms and at the same time maintain the precision of hand carving. I have also just found a new love in my life, only this week - the potential to transfer image onto plaster, which has opened onto new design potentials. I now have a way to speak through pattern, to communicate meaning directly to a viewer but what is the most important thing to say? The materials and processes of ceramic have global significance, through them I can look backward as well as forward, across continents and across language barriers, perhaps this is where the answer lies, what more important message can there be than to remind us of our interconnectedness, our shared humanity. I¡¯m now at a very exiting pivotal point in my practise, changing direction completely with new processes. It¡¯s a very satisfying feeling to constantly be learning and developing new techniques. My task now is to radically change form and begin distilling my concept in to surface¡­.


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Level 4 Induction to Key Ceramic Processes

This term CSAD Level four students have begun a series of in depth process workshops comprising hand building with Claire Curneen, Matthew Thompson and Natasha Mayo, throwing techniques with Duncan Ayscough and plaster work with Caroline Taylor and Pauline Monkcom.

This term CSAD Level four students have begun a series of in depth process workshops comprising hand building with Claire Curneen, Matthew Thompson and Natasha Mayo, throwing techniques with Duncan Ayscough and plaster work with Caroline Taylor and Pauline Monkcom.

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WELCOME BACK EVERYONE!

…a new term begins, lets make every moment count because it does!

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Welcome First Year Ceramics Students

WELCOME FIRST YEAR BA CERAMICS STUDENTS FROM ALL OF US HERE AT THE NATIONAL CENTRE FOR CERAMICS WALES

Just think of all that potential!

Just think of all that potential!


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CSAD Magazine: Featured Student – Jude Gill

CSAD Magazine: Featured Artist - Jude Gill

CSAD Magazine: Featured Artist - Jude Gill

Click on the image above to read about Jude’s experience on the BA and Ma ceramic programmes at National Centre for Ceramics, Wales

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International Ceramics Festival: Festival Assistant Opportunity

Press on the image above to down load the application form and view the types of duties required:

The International Ceramics Festival is the UK¡¯s leading international ceramics event, attracting over 800 participants to a series of lectures, practical demonstrations and exhibitions over three days. The focus is both practical and inspirational ¨C kilns are built and fired, pots made and demonstrations given. Guest artists also have their own workspace enabling more in depth discussions and exchange of ideas. Over the years the Festival has built up a reputation for featuring some of the world¡¯s best known ceramic artists and potters.

Being a festival assistant is a great opportunity to take part in this festival and see, meet and work with leading international potters. As well as making friends and meeting like-minded individuals, festival assistants gain skills and experiences. Festival assistants play a key part in the success of the Festival, the work they do may involve them working closely with festival organizers, arts centre staff, trade exhibitors and demonstrators. The jobs required vary widely from physical work to administrative duties, offering opportunities for most people to take part.